Prototype Android Apps in Microsoft SketchFlow

Prototype Android Apps in Microsoft SketchFlow

(If you are a C# | XAML dev and prototype cross-platform apps, Xamarin anyone, these template projects can make your job very easy!)

This is third post in the series of SketchFlow template projects for prototyping apps for mobile devices. Last two posts were for Windows Phone & iPhone 6.

Pull this and various platform template SketchFlow projects from GitHub.

This post introduces Android Lollipop template project for SketchFlow. For this first Android template I chose LG G3 phone skeleton as base and added Lollipop home screen for more in-time feel in prototype. As and when I get time I will add more Android devices which can be easily swapped in the prototype in seconds.

For a quick demo of Android Lollipop prototype template project, have a look at this video:

Some screenshots of the project in action:
Screen_2 Android Lollipop LG G3 Microsoft Blend SketchFlow Prototype App Development in Visual Studio

Screen_2 Android Lollipop LG G3 Microsoft Blend SketchFlow Prototype App Development in Visual Studio

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App Mock Up

App Mock Up

Sharp Snippets

You are toying with an idea of creating a new app. If you are not replicating functionality of some other app, you would go through the process of visualizing your idea in the form of app UI. You don’t want to jump into code at this time but want to feel how information in the app will be placed and how it will look inside the screen boundaries. This process is a pre-cursor to UX development or full-fledged wire-frame creation. This process of visualizing the idea takes some time before you are confident about how you want to take your app forward and jump into some sort of coding. Paper+pen or whiteboard+marker are good way to work through fluid ideas and layout information. This is not the phase when you are working on UX or designing UI, but just laying out ideas in rough screens. I personally like drawing and…

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iPhone 6 Project For App Prototyping in Microsoft SketchFlow

iPhone 6 Project For App Prototyping in Microsoft SketchFlow

I have updated Microsoft Blend SketchFlow project for latest iPhone 6 frame. Download projects from GitHub. As earlier the project has built in iPhone 6 frame, animated keyboard image, iPhone 6 home screen, and clickable home button.

My earlier posts have detailed information about other Sketchflow projects and video tutorial of how to use them.

SketchFlow is a powerful prototyping tool. In last post I shared Windows Phone SketchFlow template project. Here I am sharing iPhone skeleton project for SketchFlow. Both these projects are similar in functionality with different phone frames. Android projects are on their way. Read more…

ASO Tool: Cover Your Keywords

ASO Tool: Cover Your Keywords

Download KeywordsSearch.xlsx from GitHub.

ASO stands for App Store Optimization (like SEO; Search Engine Optimization). Know more here. To improve the chances of search engines or app stores (Windows Phone Store, Google Play, iTunes – Apple iPhone and iPAD Store) finding your app, your app needs a good description (apart from the keywords provided by the store) which includes as many related words. To achieve this, you would typically first decide your app related keywords and use them in app description. This is easier said than done. To help, I created this small tool in Microsoft Excel, which you can use to list down the keywords with value of importance, type description, and see the coverage of keywords you have used in your description. Download KeywordsSearch.xlsx from GitHub.

How to use?

ASO Excel Tool for Application Search Optimization Google Play Store Windows Phone

  1. Decide keywords and type them according to their value in the respective columns. High value keywords are those which are a must for app’s discoverability. Medium value keywords are important and low value ones are good to have.
  2. Type app’s description in this cell. Try to include as many keywords as possible in your text. As and when you want to see which of the keywords you have used in your description, either exit out of the cell by pressing Tab or press ctrl + Enter. You will notice that the words you have used in the text have now green background, and those which are still not used remain with red background. Keep typing and try to turn as many words as possible, green.
  3. The coverage section will show what percent of High, Medium, and Low value keywords you have used in the text you have typed.
  4. Legend section talks about meaning of color and formatting of text in keyword list.

Prototype iPhone Apps in SketchFlow

Prototype iPhone Apps in SketchFlow

Edit: Updated for iPhone 6

Download projects from GitHub.

SketchFlow is a powerful prototyping tool. In last post I shared Windows Phone SketchFlow template project. Here I am sharing iPhone skeleton project for SketchFlow. Both these projects are similar in functionality with different phone frames. Android projects are on their way.

Download projects from GitHub.

Excerpt from earlier Post:

Those who have exposure to Visual Studio Blend, WPF/Silverlight developers, SketchFlow comes as natural extension to quickly prototype app ideas. Other prototyping tools are – Pencil, Balsamiq,Axure, SmartDraw, Visio etc. Recently, I wrote an introductory post about open source prototyping tool, Pencil, with example navigation flow screens. In my experience I found SketchFlow to be very efficient in creating high-fidelity prototypes. This project template gives, out-of-the-box, phone frame images, dummy keyboard with interactive states, back button, and home button. The phone frame images included are – Windows Phone emulator stock image, Nokia Lumia 925, Nokia Lumia 1520, and HTC One. Android phones and iPhone are in plans.

For a quick demo, have a look at this video:

Following are some screen shots of the SketchFlow player:

SketchFlow Prototype Project iPhone iOS Keyboard Windows Phone AppDev Blend Visual Studio WFP XAML Animation

SketchFlow Prototype Project iPhone iOS Keyboard Windows Phone AppDev Blend Visual Studio WFP XAML Animation

Accelerate App Reviews

Accelerate App Reviews

Asking for review in your app? It’s tricky. If not done with due diligence, on encountering your request to review, users might get annoyed and still worse, they could rate your app low even though they liked it. A simplistic solution of asking for review after N days from installation (or first use) and N days after user has chosen “remind me later”, is not an appropriate solution. Why? User might have installed your app, ran it, exited, came back after N days and they were presented with a review request message, whereas, they had only used the app once. This is not a nice experience. Asking for review when user is exiting the app is less effective because user already has something else in their mind when they are coming out of the app.

Though there is no one solution that fits all, but this is how I try to tackle this scenario in my app. It’s not the “number of days” but “total minutes user has used your app” is my criteria to decide the interval of popping review message. I keep a record of overall usage of the app, and after a designated number of minutes, I pop a request to user. You might have to go through some trial and error to come up with the right “number of minutes” when you want to request. Determine whether your app is highly immersive or a quick open and shut type of app. In an immersive app|game you might want your review requests at longer intervals. In a less immersive app, you would rather ask earlier and at a less frequency. Then, you might want to gradually decrease the interval between requests during session. Don’t forget to code your logic in such a way that you could easily tune request intervals and accumulative usage time and update your app as soon as you realize that a change in the times is required. Here is pseudo-code for indication purpose:


[THIS IS PSEUDO CODE FOR INDICATION ONLY]

constant int POP_REQUEST_AFTER_ACCUMULATIVE_USAGE (adjusting knob) 
constant int POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL (adjusting knob : Initial interval between requests in the session) 
constant int POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL_DECREASE_BY (adjusting knob : Decrease interval after every request) 
constant int POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL_MINIMUM (adjusting knob : interval should not go below this)

int AccumulativeAppUsage (persist this info in storage)
DateTime LastReviewRequest;
Int ReviewRequestInterval = POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL;

App.Start | App.Activate
	DateTime AppStart
	LastReviewRequest = DateTime.Now //reset

App.Stop | App.Deactivate
	AccumulativeAppUsage += DateTime.NOW – AppStart
	Save AccumulativeAppUsage

Page.[identify the event which triggers PopRequest method]
	PopRequest()

PopRequest()
	totalUsageTillNow = AccumulativeAppUsage += DateTime.NOW – AppStart
	if(totalUsageTillNow >= POP_REQUEST_AFTER_ACCUMULATIVE_USAGE)
	{
		If(DateTime.Now – LastReviewRequest >= ReviewRequestInterval)
		{
			Show review request
			LastReviewRequest = DateTime.Now
			If(ReviewRequestInterval > POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL_MINIMUM)
				ReviewRequestInterval -= POP_REQUEST_INTERVAL_DECREASE_BY
		}
	}

Top Screen – Life Saver

Apart from being very useful, this idea of Top Screen can even save lives on road. Keep your phone in front pocket with Top Screen facing up and you don’t have to take out your phone to check time, battery, incoming mail count, connection, etc. Just a glance and you are good. When you are driving, keep your phone on dashboard with top screen facing you and you are good to go. This is a fantastic idea.
secondaryscreen2